10 Resolutions To Make In Your Garden This Year

Every year, I make a list of things I want to achieve or change in my garden. But the year passes, I get busy planning my clients’ landscapes and before I know it, it’s mid summer. That is not an ideal time to start something new in the garden.

I’ve promised myself that this year, however, will be different. All those ideas I’ve jotted down in my garden notebook? I plan to convert at least some of them into reality. And January is the perfect time to sit down and create a plan for just how all of it will happen. Continue reading

Spring Bulbs: Still Time To Plant Some Of These 10 Great Varieties

Spring bulbs in a formal garden setting

Yesterday I directed the planting of two thousand spring bulbs. We placed them individually in patterns and our team dug them one-by-one into the earth. When they were finished, we dressed the bulbs with a thick layer of mulch and all stepped back to admire our handiwork. The garden felt like it was bursting with energy with so much promise nestled snuggly underground. Continue reading

What To Do If Your Spring Bulbs Come Up Too Early

(Last week it was 70 degrees, now it’s 20)

Let’s face it. It’s hard not to stress when your daffodils start popping up mid-winter. As weather becomes more unpredictable, early growth is becoming more and more common in spring bulbs. Not to worry, though. Your plants have seen it all before. And they’re built to handle a few temperature swings.

The underground world of bulbs

To understand why spring bulbs can survive a little premature growth, it helps to take a peek underground.

Botanically speaking, a bulb is a modified stem that houses a miniature plant. In addition to roots, it contains food storage tissue, leaves, stems and a flowering shoot. As soon as you plant it in the fall, a spring bulb starts growing.

The action begins in the basal stem. During the winter months, roots emerge from the bottom of the bulb to penetrate the surrounding soil. As they grow, they absorb water and other nutrients, which they store in the fleshy leaves of the bulb called scales.

In some flower species like alliums, a thin papery covering called the tunic protects the bulb’s scales from damage and drying out.

Papery thin tunic keeps bulbs from drying out

In addition to food storage, the scales also protect the flowering shoot. This vital part of the bulb contains all of the above-ground parts of the plant, including leaves and flowers. During the winter months, the shoot slowly grows upwards within the bulb. Eventually it develops into a stem.

Depending on the species, a bulb is pre-programmed to emerge at a set time in the spring. The leaves are first to break through the soil. Once they surface, they immediately begin converting sunlight into energy. Approximately one month later, the flowering shoot becomes visible.

At this stage in the process, the key thing to remember is this: Leaf development occurs independently of flower development.

The leaves might jump the gun, but the flowering shoot needs an extended period of time (between 5 and 7 weeks) before it will begin sending its stem up towards the surface. Before that happens, the bulb has most likely weathered the warm spell and resumed dormancy.

Strategies for protecting early growth

If you see foliage poking up out of the ground too early, don’t worry. A cold snap may cause the leaves to yellow and die back, but the bulb will wait things out and send up new growth once temperatures warm up again.

There are a few strategies, however, that you can implement now to slow things down while adding an extra layer of protection to the flowering shoot.

1. COVER YOUR PLANT

Covering the soil around your spring bulbs will provide insulation against frigid temperatures and drying winter winds. Try mulch, straw, bark chips, leaves or pine needles.

Or, if the plant is budding too early, try draping a cloth over it (securing it above the plant with stakes.) Remove the drape during the day so the foliage can absorb sunlight to warm back up.

2. WATER DURING DRY SPELLS

If there’s been a dry period for a long period of time, a little extra water during the day helps bulbs grow. However, make sure your soil has good drainage. They may rot if they receive too much water.

3.  IF FLOWERS START TO APPEAR

If the weather continues to stay unseasonably warm, your spring bulbs may start to produce flowers. Don’t worry. Even if frost kills off some of the initial buds, it usually won’t affect flowering in the coming months.

4. PLANT BULBS LATE IN THE FALL

The later in the fall you plant, the longer the bulb will take to sprout come spring. Wait until the temperature is cold enough (40°F or below at night) to plant your spring bulbs. This will ensure they are fully dormant. Here in Maryland, I plant my many different daffodil varieties as late as mid December.

Finally, make sure to plant your bulbs at three times their height in depth with the base down and the bud up. Planting bulbs too shallow can lead to premature growth.

For a list of ten popular spring bulbs and when and how to plant them, click here.

Happy planting!