U.S. Botanic Garden Presents DC Landmarks Made From Plants

U.S. Capitol made from plant-based materials at the U.S. Botanic Garden's annual holiday display

Plant-based replica of the United States Capitol

Those of us who live near Washington, DC seldom fail to be moved by the majestic buildings and monuments that comprise our capital city. And the United States Botanic Garden, one of the oldest botanic gardens in North America, is one of them. Now at holiday time comes a special treat: the Garden’s annual tribute to the city’s most famous landmarks constructed from, you guessed it, plants and other plant-based materials.

The eye-catching display is part of the U.S. Botanic Garden’s “Season’s Greenings” holiday exhibit that also features seasonal flowers and shrubs, a garden railway with model trains and a top-notch collection of unusual poinsettias. It was created by Paul Busse (most famous for the New York Botanical Garden’s Holiday Train Show) and his Kentucky-based firm, Applied Imagination. A team of horticulturalists, botanical architects and landscape designers used over 70 different plant materials to build their sculptures.

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Model train passes through a botanical Grand Canyon

Botanical Landmarks On A Mini Mall

At the heart of any trip to Washington, DC is a trip to the National Mall. And the botanical replicas, positioned as they are along the broad walkways and twin pools of the Garden Court, echo the actual ones just a stone’s throw away outside. Each architectural gem is sited high on a mound from which it surveys its own pint-sized garden vista.

The crown jewel of the collection, the U.S. Capitol, is located to the left of the Court.The seven-foot-long structure, which is formed of sycamore leaves, willow sticks, acorns and other natural materials, took over 600 hours to complete. A peek inside reveals the Statue of Freedom and other figures fashioned from beech nuts, corn husks, acorns and pinecone scales.

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U.S. Capitol

Facing the U.S. Capitol on the opposite side of the Garden Court is the Washington Monument constructed from sycamore leaves, sea grape leaves and moss. The Garden’s blue-tiled ornamental pool (one of a pair) stretches behind it.

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Washington Monument

A gourd forms the dome of the Jefferson Memorial. While inside presides a mini President Jefferson with hair made out of lichens.

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Jefferson Memorial

Occupying the far end of the pool from the Washington Monument, the Lincoln Memorial features an exterior of sea grape leaves and architectural details made from kangaroo pods, sisal rope and grape tendrils among other materials.

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The Library of Congress shines amidst its lush green landscape. Its facade is crafted from elm and locust bark. Sea grape leaves make up the terrace.

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Library of Congress

The U.S. Botanic Garden conservatory has a facade made from horse chestnut bark and willow sticks.

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U.S. Botanic Garden

Located on the opposite side of the pool from the U.S. Capitol, the Supreme Court building features a frieze made from beech nuts, acorns and silver birch buds.

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U.S. Supreme Court

The White House is surrounded by a fence made from screw pod rails and cinnamon tops. while bas-relief columns in palm frond stems and cinnamon curls. There’s a swing-set in front.

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For more information on this fun exhibit as well as the garden railway (which run through January 3, 2017), click here for the official U.S. Botanic Garden website. It’s entirely worth the visit.

 

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About carole funger

I'm a garden designer and Maryland Master Gardener living in the Washington, DC area. I blog about new trends in horticulture, inspiring gardens to visit and the latest tips and ideas for how to nurture your own beautiful garden. Every garden tells a story. What's yours?

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